Review Details

WASD V2 104-Key Barebones Mechanical Keyboard

WASD V2 104-Key Barebones Mechanical Keyboard

Product Review (submitted on July 25, 2016):
I purchased two of these keyboards last week, a blue switch and a brown switch version, and they finally arrived today. For the past six years I have been using a Das Keyboard Ultimate S with Cherry MX blue switches. Lately, I have been having problems because there are broken and cracked solder joints under a large number of switches in my Das that I haven't had time to go and fix. The worst of my problems, however was the cord. It's fraying for some reason. These keyboards seem somewhat more solid and less hollow than the Das. One of the things that bothered me a lot about the Das is that it resonates with the clicks from your already noisy blue keyswitches making for quite a racket when you are typing. If you don't like the attention, this can be the worst thing ever. Worst yet, I switched to mechanical keyboards because of hand problems, and they help a lot, so I can't just grab a regular keyboard off the shelf. As much as I have tried rubber dome keyboards, after a day of typing on one, I get shooting pain in my wrists. I do not get this on mechanical boards. This board doesn't seem to resonate like the Das. It's a lot quieter, even with the one with the blue keyswitches. This attracts a lot less attention. The detachable cable is a huge plus because if it ever gets damaged, I can easily just buy a new one, or I can accessorise with different cords depending on my mood. I can also pick a shorter or longer cord depending on what I need that day. Another thing I really like about this keyboard is that you can change the layout in the hardware using the DIP switches. I used my Das keyboard with my iOS device (iPhone 6 Plus) using the USB adapter, and in iOS, you cannot change the modifier key layout like you can in Mac OS X. With this keyboard, you can just switch it to Mac mode and the modifiers are where they need to be with the command keys next to the space bar. It makes it less annoying when I pull the keyboard off my Mac and connect it to my iOS device. Another neat thing is that if you enable the Fn key (the menu key is useless anyway in Mac OS X and iOS), all the media keys work as expected in Mac OS X and iOS (except Stop, which Macs and iOS devices don't have). You can raise and lower your volume, mute it, skip forward and backwards in playlists, play and pause music and videos, and either eject optical discs if you have a Mac or show and hide the on-screen keyboard in iOS. (If you have a hardware keyboard, pressing the eject button can show and hide the on-screen keyboard). Another nice plus with this keyboard is like the Das keyboard, you don't need to connect your iOS device to external power to use this keyboard. This means that you can use it anywhere you are and with either the older USB 2.0 adapter which has no lightning port or the newer USB 3.0 adapter which as a lightning port. Overall, this is a really great keyboard. I'm really impressed with it.